RECORD: Saunders, William Wilson. 1863. On the species of Catascopus found by Mr.Wallace in the Malay Peninsular [sic] and East Indian Islands. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 1: 455- 469, pl. XVII, XVIII.

REVISION HISTORY: Transcribed (single key) by AEL Data 2012. RN1


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XXXVI. On the Species of Catascopus found by Mr. Wallace in the Malay Peninsular and East Indian Islands. By W. W. SAUNDERS, Esq., F.R.S., F.L.S., V.-P. Ent. Soc., &c.

[Read 3rd November, 1862].

BARON CHAUDOIR, in the "Berliner Entomologische Zeitschrift" for 1861, page 116, gives a sketch of the genus Catascopus, Hope, enumerating the species known at the time, and describing some new species, the results of Mr. Wallace's researches in the East Indies. This genus being a favourite of mine, I carefully examined the species belonging to it received from Mr. Wallace, and it appeared to me that I had several which were undescribed in the memoir alluded to. I placed the whole series aside for further examination, and with a view of describing those species which might prove new, when Dr. Schaum (who has rescently visited this country) kindly gave me his valuable assistance, and pointed out to me the species described by Baron Chaudoir; and it was then apparent, that there were four well-marked forms new to science, two of them remarkable for size and the brilliancy of their metallic colouring. Descriptions of these will be found hereafter. Including the four new species, there appear to be twelve detected by Mr. Wallace. The whole will be found in the following tabular statement, which will clearly point out the distribution of the species;—

Names of Species. Continent of India. East Indian Islands.
Schaumii, W. W. S. Sarawack.
facialis Wied. Indian Ternate; Batchian; Amboina.
angulatus, Chaud. Malacca Sarawack; Ternate; Java.
Aruensis, W. W. S. Aru.
oxygonus, Chaud. Malacca
brachypterus, Chaud. Singapore Sarawack.
elegans, Chaud. Celebes; Amboina; Ceram; Batchian.
—— var. Singapore Sarawack.
amœnus, Chaud. Dorey; Aru.
aculeatus, Chaud. Celebes.
l[illeg]vigatus, W. W. S. Batchian; Aru.
—— var. W. W. S. Ternate.
cupripennis, Thom. Singapore Sarawack.
splendidus, W. W. S. Sarawack.

Of these twelve, ten are new to science, and we see from the table

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that five of the species are common to the continent of India and the East Indian Islands; viz., facialis, angulatus, brachypterus, elegans and cupripennis: six are peculiar to the islands—viz., Schaumii, Aruensis, amænus, aculeatus, lævigatus and splendidus; and one species, oxygonus, is from the Continent alone.

Of the species from the Islands, three seem to be very generally spread—viz., facialis, angulatus and elegans; the others are restricted to one or two localities. It is worthy of remark, that the species found on the Continent have all, except one, been detected at Sarawack.

Looking now to the whole of the species of Catascopus, they amount, in Baron Chaudoir's sketch, to thirty-one. Add to this four, the number of new species described in this paper, and we get thirty-five as the present extent of the genus.

These are distributed as follows:—

Main land of India 8
East Indian Islands 13
West Africa 6
East Africa 2
Tropical America 3
Australia 1
Undetermined 2
35

From this distribution it is evident that the head-quarters of the genus is the East, and that in India and the East Indian Islands more than half of the species are to be found. It is remarkable, that while the East Indian Islands abound in different species, only one has been detected in Australia, although the Australian continent so closely approximates to the Islands in the vicinity of Timor and New Guinea, and that this state of things is reversed as regards the continent of India, which very closely approaches the Islands at Singapore, for eight species are found on the continent, five of which, as before observed, are common to the Islands. The genus Catascopus appears to be peculiar to the tropics or the warmer parts of the globe, and there is every reason to suppose that the number of species will be considerably augmented when the researches of naturalists have more fully made known the entomological riches of tropical India. I make this observation, for new species of Catascopus are frequently turning up; and in a collection I have lately received from Siam, made by the late M. Mouhot, there are two species which I believe to

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be new, although I cannot finally determine this point until I am certain of the characters of the species described by Schmidt Gobel in his Birman Fauna.

1. Catascopus Schaumii, W. W. S. (Pl. XVII. fig. 3.)

Above, shining, brilliant, metallic blue-green, the elytra crossed a little below the centre with a broad, ill-defined, dark-purple band; underside of body dark purplish-green.

Head broad, slightly contracted towards the thorax, with two deep, longitudinal foveæ between the eyes; the upper surface rounded and minutely punctured. Antennæ rather short, robust, dark bronzy-purple, as well as the parts of the mouth.

Thorax rather broader than long, wider than the head, much contracted posteriorly, the lateral margins narrowly margined and rounded, the anterior margin very slightly emarginate, the posterior margin slightly sinuate, and the hinder angles sharply pointed, with the upper surface very finely striate transversely, and having a deep transverse depression a little behind the anterior margin, and a central logitudinal furrow, commencing at the transverse depression and reaching nearly to the hinder margin.

Elytra broader than the thorax, half as long again as broad; the shoulders prominent and slightly rounded, the lateral margins nearly straight and parallel, rounded posteriorly, with a deep emargination at the apex of each elytron, the commencement of the emargination having a sharp, broad tooth, and there being two small teeth at the termination; the surface of each elytron with eight deep striæ more or less punctate, and the interstices nearly smooth.

Legs robust and rather long. Tarsi ferruginous-brown.

Length 8/10 inch.

Hab. Sarawack. Wallace.

This is the largest species of Catascopus with which I am acquainted, and at the same time the most brilliant and rich in its colours. The size, and the broad purple band across the elytra, easily distinguish it as a species. In position it seems to approach to C. Withillii of Hope, which is found on the continent of India. I have named it after Dr. Schaum, so well known for his extensive and accurate knowledge of Entomology, and especially for his acquaintance with the family of insects to which Catascopus belongs. I am much indebted to him for aiding me in determining the species described in this paper.

VOL. I. THIRD SERIES, PART VI.—MAY, 1863. 11

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2. Catascopus Aruensis, W. W. S. (Pl. XVII. fig. 5.)

Dark blueish shining green, with the head and thorax of a bronzy hue.

Head somewhat elongate, restricted behind, with the upper surface very smooth and rounded, and having two elongate, roughish depressions between the eyes. Antennæ robust, bronzy- purple, as well as the parts of the mouth.

Thorax nearly quadrate, with the angles prominent, the sides narrowly margined and somewhat contracted posteriorly; the anterior margin slightly emarginate, the posterior quite straight; the upper surface very finely striate transversely, with a longitudinal central furrow running into a curved depression, which passes nearly parallel with the anterior margin.

Elytra somewhat broader than the thorax, about once and a half as long as broad, the shoulders prominent, the sides nearly parallel, the apices rounded and strongly emarginate, with a sharp, broad tooth at the commencement of the emargination, and another at the apex of each elytron. The upper surface regularly and rather deeply striate.

Legs moderate. Tarsi pitchy-brown.

Length 6/10 inch.

Aru. Wallace.

The nearly quadrate shape of the thorax is a good distinguishing character of this species.

3. Catascopus lævigatus, W. W. S. (Pl. XVIII. fig. 2.)

Uniform shining dark metallic green.

Head transverse, rounded above, with two longitudinal, rough depressions between the eyes, curving outwards and extending half the length of the head; upper surface behind the depressions very smooth, with a few long hairs about the eyes. Antennæ short, pitchy-brown, as well as the palpi. Labrum and mandibles bronzy-purple.

Thorax transverse, much broader than long, the sides narrowly margined, rounded and contracted behind, fringed on the anterior half with long hairs; the anterior margin very slightly emarginate, the posterior margin quite straight; the upper surface with slight transverse striæ and a central, longitudinal furrow, and with two depressions, one on either side near the lateral margins, and a slight one in front near the anterior margin.

Elytra broader than the thorax, about once and a quarter as long as broad, with the shoulders prominent, the sides somewhat curved outwards, and the apices rounded and strongly emarginate,

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with a sharp tooth on either side of the emargination; the upper surface very minutely punctate, and having eight regular, shallow, punctate striæ.

Legs moderate, with the tarsi dark pitchy-brown.

Length 9/30 inch.

Hab. Batchian, Ternate and Aru. Wallace.

This is a broad, glossy species, of no great size, with a broad thorax. A specimen from Ternate appears to have the foregoing characters, except that the lateral margins of the thorax are less rounded. It can scarcely be considered as a species.

4. Catascopus splendidus, W. W. S. (Pl. XVII. fig. 1.)

Above, bright, shining, copper-coloured; the head, thorax and the suture of the elytra with greenish reflections. Underside of body and the legs dark, shining green.

Head slightly contracted behind, with the upper part rounded and uneven with minute undulations, with two rather deep, rounded depressions between the eyes. The antennæ and parts of the mouth nearly black.

Thorax rather broader than the head and somewhat longer than broad, much contracted posteriorly, with the sides narrowly margined and rounded; the anterior angles prominent and pointed, the posterior angles well pronounced; the anterior margin slightly emarginate, the hinder margin nearly straight; the upper surface much rounded, very smooth, with a deep, longitudinal, central furrow, and an elongate, curved depression a little behind the anterior margin.

Elytra broader than the thorax, with the sides parallel, once and a half as long as broad; the shoulders prominent and rounded, with the apices rounded and strongly emarginate, with a broad, sharply-pointed tooth at the commencement of each emargination, and another tooth, rather longer and narrower than the first, at the apex of each elytron; the upper surface very smooth and somewhat undulating, with eight irregular longitudinal striæ, those near the sides slightly punctate.

Legs long, rather slender; tarsi black.

Length 7/10 inch.

Hab. Sarawack. Wallace.

A fine brilliant species, resembling in colour and form the C. cupripennis of Thom., but differing in the much larger size, in the shape of the thorax, which is much broader, and in the character of the upper surface of the elytra, which is more undulating and reflecting the copper tints much more brilliantly.

112

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Supplementary Paper.

[Read 5th January, 1863.]

AT the last November meeting of the Entomological Society, I read a paper on the species of the genus Catascopus discovered by Mr. Wallace chiefly in the East Indian Islands, describing four new species. Since the paper was read, Mr. Wallace has kindly lent me the whole of the specimens of this genus, forming a portion of his rich private collection, from which I have gained much information regarding the species already described by myself and others; and a careful examination of the series has shown me seven additional undescribed species, as well as some variations in the characters of the determined species which deserve to be noted. In the following pages descriptions of these new species will be found, and also some remarks on the characters of other species just alluded to. As these additional species considerably alter the tables of geographical distribution given in my first paper, I have thought it desirable to give fresh tables, which will be found hereafter. I am indebted to Mr. Wallace for the following interesting remarks on the habits of some of the species of Catascopus which he met with while prosecuting his valuable natural history researches in the East.

"The species of the genus Catascopus are semi-nocturnal in their habits, never flying except at night. The species taken at Dorey (viz., Wallacei, W. W. S.; elongatus, W. W. S.; Aruensis, W. W. S; amœnus, Chaud.) flew against me at dusk. The greater part of the species and individuals I have taken have, however, been captured under the decaying bark of fallen trees.

As soon as the bark of a tree splits and cracks so as to separate it from the wood, the Catasacopi frequent it, but I could scarcely ever capture them in that position, owing to their great activity and the force required to tear off the bark. After a tree has lain about a year the bark becomes rotten and can be easily broken off, and then, by the assistance of a net, the insects which lurk beneath it can be more easily captured. The larger species found in Malacca, Borneo and Singapore used frequently to be seen coursing along the surface of some immense fallen trees, from one crack to another, their brilliant bodies glittering splendidly in the sunlight.

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To capture them was by no means easy, as they would get under the trunk where it touched the ground, if closely pursued and no friendly crevice was at hand. Many an hour have I pleasantly spent in hunting them in the dense swampy forests of Borneo. In Malacca and Singapore the spice of fear and danger would be added to the interest of the sport, owing to the probable vicinity of tigers, who might at any moment be watching us as eagerly and with as deadly a purpose as we were watching the poor Catascopi.

However closely pursued I have never seen one of these insects fly in the day time, neither do they come out at all into the light, except to visit some part of the trunk they reside in, to which the subcortical passages do not extend. The beautiful purple-banded species from Borneo, C. Schaumii, W. W. S., was brought to me by some Dyaks engaged in felling trees in the swampy forests near Sarawack. The species and individuals of this genus are much more abundant in Malacca and Borneo than in the equally luxuriant forests of the Molucas and New Guinea."

Table showing the geographical distribution of the species of Catascopus detected by Mr. Wallace.

Species. Continent of India. East Indian Islands.
Schaumii, W. W. S. Sarawack.
Wallacei, W. W. S. Wagiou; Dorey; Mysol.
facialis, Wied. India, Malacca Ternate; Batchian; Amboina; Ceram.
angulatus, Chaud. Malacca Sarawack; Ternate; Java; Macassar.
Aruensis, W. W. S. Aru; Dorey.
oxygonus, Chaud. Malacca Sarawack.
versicolor, W. W. S. Sumatra.
brachypterus, Chaud. Singapore Sarawack.
elegans, Chaud. Celebes; Amboina; Ceram; Batchian; Macassar.
punctipennis, W. W. S. Singapore
amænus, Chaud. Dorey; Aru; Tonda; Batchian; Amboina; Ceram.
aculeatus, Chaud. Celebes; Macassar.
rugicollis, W. W. S. Macassar.
lævipennis, W. W. S. Tonda.
lævigatus, W. W. S. Batchian; Aru; Ternate.
elongatus, W. W. S. Dorey.
cupripennis, Thom Singapore
æneus. W. W. S. Sarawack.
splendidus, W. W. S. Sarawack.

Making nineteen species in all discovered by Mr. Wallace, showing an addition of one species to the continent of India and

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six to the East Indian Islands, in excess of those mentioned in my former paper.

Taking the new species into account, the whole number of Catascopi now recorded will amount to forty-two, and they are thus distributed:—

Main land of India 9
East Indian Islands 19
West Africa 6
East Africa 2
Tropical America 3
Australia 1
Undertermined 2
42

1. Catascopus Wallacei, W. W. S. (Pl. XVII. fig. 4.)

Colour rich dark purple, with the head black, and the thorax of a brilliant shining copper colour. The parts of the mouth and the antennæ are pitchy-red.

The head is elongate broad, somewhat constricted behind the eyes, which are very prominent, and have between them two deep, elongate, somewhat rough depressions. It is very shining and smooth on the upper surface. The antennæ are rather short and stout.

The thorax is rather broader than the head, transverse, sub-quadrate, with the lateral margins curving inwards towards the base, and having the posterior angles very acute, the anterior angles prominent and slightly rounded, and having also the anterior margin somewhat emarginate and the posterior margin nearly straight. The upper surface is highly polished, marked with very slight transverse striæ, and having a deep central longitudinal depression, terminating a little before the anterior margin, where it spreads slightly on either side.

The elytra are considerably broader than the thorax, with the sides nearly parallel, rounded posteriorly, and the shoulders prominent and rounded. The apex of each elytron is deeply emarginate, with a sharp spine at the commencement and another shorter one at the termination of the emargination on the suture of the elytra. The surface of the elytra is smooth and somewhat shining, each elytron having eight decided, rather shallow, slightly punctate striæ; the 3rd and 4th from the lateral margins being much closer set than the others. Underside of the body smooth and shining.

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The legs are rather long, with the joints of the tarsi pitchy-brown.

Length 7/10 inch.

Hab. Wagiou, Dorey and Mysol. In Mr. Wallace's collection and my own.

This is one of the most beautiful species of the genus, and may at once be distinguished by the brilliant thorax, rich purple elytra, and the length of the spines at the apex of the elytra. I have named it after Mr. Wallace, to whom Entomologists are so much indebted for the discovery of so many new insects, including several of the most beautiful and extraordinary known.

2. Catascopus versicolor, W. W. S. (Pl. XVIII. fig. 1.)

Colour rich shining metallick green, with the parts of the mouth, antennæ and tarsi purplish-black, and the elytra suffused with rich copper colour from the apex to nearly [illeg] of their length.

The head is elongate, somewhat contracted behind, the upper side with two deep rough depressions between the eyes, behind which the surface is very smooth. Antennæ rather thin, about the length of the head and thorax combined. The eyes are prominent.

The thorax is rather broader than the head, cordato-quadrate, with the anterior and posterior margins straight, the angles prominent, and the sides narrowly margined. Above it is quite smooth, with a deep central depression running nearly the whole length, which is deeper and broader anteriorly.

The elytra are considerably broader than the thorax, with the sides nearly parallel and rounded posteriorly, and having the shoulders prominent and somewhat rounded. The apices of the elytra are deeply emarginate and each drawn into a short pointed tooth, and there is also a sharp shortish tooth at the commencement of each emargination. The upper surface of each elytron is marked with eight deep, longitudinal, punctate striæ; the 3rd and 4th from the suture the widest apart; the 4th and 5th close to each other, and so also the 6th and 7th, which are nearly as closely set. The underside of the body is purplish-black.

The legs are moderate in length.

Length 5/10 inch.

Sumatra. In Mr. Wallace's collection.

A species of moderate size, coming near to C. oxygonus of Chaudoir, but differing in the emargination and spines at the apex of the elytra and the deeply punctate striæ of the same.

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3. Catascopus rugicollis, W. W. S. (Pl. XVIII. fig. 6.)

Colour dark bronzy-green, with the thorax slightly suffused with copper colour, and having the parts of the mouth, antennæ, legs and underside of the body shining purplish-black.

The head is elongate, somewhat constricted behind, with the upper surface shining, minutely rugoso-punctate, and with two rough, shallow depressions in front, nearly in a line with the base of the antennæ, from which proceed narrow, line-like depressions, running close to and nearly encircling the eyes. Antennæ stout, and rather short. Eyes prominent.

The thorax is transverse quadrato-cordiform, with the anterior and posterior margins straight; the angles prominent, the sides narrowly margined, and curving inwards towards the base. The upper surface is deeply and transversely striate, with a well-marked central longitudinal depression running from the base to near the anterior margin, where it branches right and left, and passes on to the anterior margin, enclosing a smooth, broadly triangular area.

The elytra are considerably wider than the thorax, once and a half as long as broad, with the sides nearly parallel and slightly emarginate a little behind the shoulders, which are somewhat prominent and rounded. Each elytron is produced into an acute, somewhat diverging spine, the apex being rounded and slightly emarginate before the spine is reached. The upper surface of the elytra is smooth and shining; each elytron with nine, nearly equally spaced, longitudinal, slightly punctate, shallow striæ

The underside of the body is smooth and shining.

Legs moderate in length.

Length 4/10 inch.

From Macassar. In Mr. Wallace's collection.

This species is near C. aculeatus, Chaud., but may at once be distinguished by the shape and sculpture of the thorax.

4. Catascopus punctipennis, W. W. S. (Pl. XVIII. fig. 4.)

The colour is rich, shining, brassy-green, with the parts of the mouth, antennæ, underside of the body and tarsi purplish-black.

The head is elongate, constricted behind the eyes, with the upper surface longitudinally, but irregularly, striate, and much more deeply so in front, where it is very rugose. The eyes are rather small and prominent.

The thorax is rather longer than broad, quadrato-cordate, about as broad as the head, with the anterior angles rounded, the hinder angles prominent, the sides narrowly margined, the anterior margin straight, and the posterior slightly rounded. The upper surface

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is very rounded and polished, and slightly transversely striate, with a deep, central, longitudinal depression, rather wider towards the anterior margin.

The elytra are much broader than the thorax, about once and a half as long as broad, the sides nearly parallel, but slightly emarginate a little behind the prominent shoulders; they are rounded posteriorly and emarginate towards the apex of each elytron, each emargination having a very short, broad tooth at its eommencement. The upper surface of each elytron has nine deeply and coarsely punctate striæ, nearly equally spaced, the fourth from the suture being widened and deeper, about one-third its length from the base.

Legs moderate in length, stout.

Length 4/10 inch.

From Singapore. In the collection of Mr. Wallace, and in my own.

This is a rather small species, with narrow thorax and broad elytra. It comes close to C. elegans, Chaud., from which it may be distinguished without difficulty by the shape of the thorax, which in C. elegans is much more quadrate, by the prominent angles of the thorax, and also by the sculpture of the elytra, which is much more decided as regards the punctured striæ.

5. Catascopus lævipennis, W. W. S. (Pl. XVIII. fig. 3.)

The colour of the head and thorax is brilliant metallic shining green; the elytra bronzy shining green; the parts of the mouth, antennæ, underside of the body and legs, purplish-black.

The head is elongate, rather constricted behind the eyes, having the space between the eyes rugosely punctate, with the longitudinal depressions running through the punctate space and dividing it into three nearly equal bands, the depressions passing behind the eyes, where they run into a series of irregular furrows, formed by raised irregular lines. Eyes somewhat prominent. Antennæ robust, rather short.

The thorax is rather broader than the head, cordato-quadrate, much narrowed behind and rounded at the anterior angles, having the hinder angles prominent and somewhat pointed; the anterior and posterior margins straight, and the sides narrowly margined. The upper surface is clavated and rounded in the centre, very smooth and shining, with a narrow central longitudinal depression.

The elytra are much broader than the thorax, about once and a half as long as broad, with the sides nearly parallel, and slightly emarginate behind the rounded shoulders, having the apices

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rounding gradually to a point, on which is situated a short, sharp, somewhat diverging tooth, and before which there is a distinct emargination, with a very short angular tooth at its commencement. The upper surface of the elytra is smooth and shining, each elytron having nine nearly equally spaced, longitudinal, punctate striæ; the first three striæ from the suture being faintly impressed, the others more decided. The underside of the body is smooth and somewhat shining.

Legs moderate.

Length 4/10 inch.

From Tonda. In Mr. Wallace's collection.

This is another species nearly allied to C. aculeatus, Chaud., from which it may be distinguished by the narrow thorax, more restricted posteriorly, by the nature of the emargination at the apices of the elytra, and by the smaller size of the insect. The tibiæ and tarsi of this species are sometimes rather ferruginous in colour.

6. Catascopus elongatus, W. W. S. (Pl. XVIII. fig. 5.)

The colour of the head is metallic shining green; thorax bright copper-colour; elytra steel-blue. The parts of the mouth, antennæ and legs are dark pitchy-red.

The head is elongate, a little restricted behind the eyes, having on the upper side, in front, two narrow longitudinal depressions close to the eyes, and passing forward to the base of the mandibles; the hinder portion of the upperside is rounded, and very smooth and shining. The antennæ are short, and not very stout.

The thorax is transverse, subquadrate, rather broader than the head, with the sides margined and curving outwards, each with two long hairs, one placed near the middle, and the other quite in front; the angles of the thorax are prominent, the posterior ones more decidedly so; the anterior and posterior margins are straight; the upper surface is rounded, shining, very slightly transversely striate on the disc, but more strongly so near the sides, with a narrow central, longitudinal depression crossing it entirely.

The elytra are rather broader than the thorax, nearly twice as long as broad, with the sides straight and nearly parallel, and having the apices rounded and emarginate, but without tooth-like projections. The upper surface of the elytra is rounded, and regularly punctate-striate; the striæ, nine in number, being very equally spaced on each elytron.

Legs rather short.

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Length 3½/10 inch.

From Dorey. In Mr. Wallace's collection.

This is a remarkable species, elongate in form, with small head and broad square thorax. It seems to run away from the normal Catascopus, but has so many of the characters of the genus that I prefer placing it as a Catascopus to increasing the number of genera in this family of insects—genera which seem to run into each other by such fine lines of demarcation that it is very difficult to say where one commences or another ends. The general imprint of similarity which nature throws over a certain group of species seems often to point out genera better than any rigid characters or forced lines of partition. The species under consideration stands alone, and is not likely to be confounded with any other that I am acquainted with.

7. Catascopus æneus, W. W. S. (Pl. XVII. fig. 2.)

The colour of the head, elytra and thorax is a bright, shining, bronzy green, the latter with the sides margined with copper colour; the parts of the mouth, antennæ, tibiæ and tarsi purplish-black, the former with the six apical joints inclining to rufous.

The head is elongate, slightly constricted behind the eyes, the upperside very polished and shining, and having two longitudinal depressions between the eyes, running into an undulating space immediately in front. The eyes are small and prominent. The antennæ are rather long and stout.

The thorax is about as broad as the head, elongate quadrato-cordiform, much contracted posteriorly, with the angles acute and prominent; the sides are narrowly margined, the anterior margin curves slightly inwards, the posterior margin is straight. The upper surface is very smooth and shining, with a central, narrow, longitudinal depression running from the base to near the anterior margin, where it forks right and left towards the anterior angles.

The elytra are broader than the thorax, about once and three-quarters as long as broad, with the sides nearly parallel, slightly swelling out a little below the middle; the shoulders are prominent and rounded. The apices of the elytra are rounded, and rather deeply emarginate, with a broad pointed tooth at the commencement of the emargination, and a small tooth at the apex of each elytron. The upper surface of the elytra is smooth and shining, each elytron having nine, nearly equally spaced, longitudinal, shallow, finely punctate striæ, which, near the shoulder and on the sides, are slightly waved in outline. The underside of the body is bronzy-green, smooth and shining.

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Legs long and rather slender.

Length 7/10 inch.

From Sarawack. In Mr. Wallace's collection.

This species comes near to C. splendidus, described in my former paper. At first I thought it was a variety of that species, but on close examination there are characters which distinguish it, as well as the difference of colour and its want of brilliancy. The distinguishing characters are, the thorax broader and less narrowed posteriorly, the elytra with the striæ nearly equally spaced, and the upper surface of the same not undulating. This species, splendidus and cupripennis, form a well-marked section of the genus, almost entitled to generic distinction.

Notes on some of the already described Species of Catascopus.

1. Catascopus facialis, Wied.

Many specimens of this species were collected by Mr. Wallace, and present variations in size as well as in the shape of the thorax, some having this part of the body more contracted posteriorly than the others, with the hinder angles a little more prominent. A specimen from Batchian has a purplish tint in the shape of an indefined band across the apical half of the elytra.

2. Catascopus amænus, Chaud.

This species varies considerably in colour, in tints from bronzy to bright coppery-green. The legs, in a specimen from Dorey, are bright rufous-brown.

3. Catascopus oxygonus, Chaud.

This species varies much in size, and the thorax is narrower in some specimens than in others.

4. Catascopus brachypterus, Chaud.

A specimen from Malacca, collected by Mr. Wallace, is nearly double the size of two specimens I have examined, one from Singapore, the other from Sarawack. It is also of an uniform bright metallic-green. I cannot find, however, any characters to distinguish it as a species.

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DESCRIPTION OF THE PLATES.

PLATE XVII.

Fig 1. Catascopus splendidus, 1 a thorax, 1 b elytron, magnified.
2. aneus, 2 a 2 b
3. Schaumii, 3 a 3 b
4. Wallacsi, 4 a 4 b
5. Aruensis, 5 a 5 b

PLATE XVIII.

Fig 1. Catascopus versicolor, 1 a thorax, 1 b elytron, magnified.
2. lævigatus, 2 a 2 b
3. lævipennis, 3 a 3 b
4. punctipennis, 4 a 4 b
5. elongatus, 5 a 5 b
6. rugicollis, 6 a 6 b


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