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NHM-WP01.003.062    Note:    [1856]   Undated MS in ink and pencil A. R. Wallace's hand, headed "The Chinaman at Singapore" with brief notes re the typical Chinese merchant, shopkeeper, planter and coolie, and Kling (Chettiar) tradesmen.   Text   Image
Rookmaaker, Kees John van Wyhe eds. Wallace, A. R. The Chinaman at Singapore. [1856] NHM-WP01.003.062 [page 1] The Chinaman at Singapore He is either a Merchant a Shopkeeper a coolie Planter or a Coolie of each of which I shall give a short sketch. The Merchant is generally a fat round faced man, with an important business-like look. He wears the plain clothes of the meanest coolie for he has perhaps been a coolie himself but he is always clean neat, his tail tipped with red silk hangs down to
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S035    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1857. Letter [dated 10 March 1857, Arru]. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of London 1856-1857: 91-93.   Text   Image   PDF
few in species to please me: in two months' hard work I can only muster fifty Longicornes, a number I reached in ten days in Singapore; but Lamellicornes are the most extraordinarily scarce; I have only nine species, and four of them single specimens; there are, however, two fine Lomaptera among them, I hope new. All other groups are the same; Geodephaga, scarcely a dozen species, and nothing remarkable; not one Cicindela; only one Tricondyla (T. aptera?) and one Theretes (T. labiata), with not
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S065    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1862. On the trade of the Eastern Archipelago with New Guinea and its islands. Journal of the Royal Geographical Society 32: 127-137.   Text   Image   PDF
surrounding districts, they are a great medium of exchange over all the Papuan countries, a little being also taken to Ternate. The mats and palm-leaf boxes are in great demand all over the Moluccas. The goods with which these various products are purchased are not very diversified, the principal being bar-iron, calico, and thin red cottons from England, choppers made in Singapore or Macassar, Bugis cloths, cheap German knives and Chinese plates and basins, brass-wire, white and coloured beads
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S065    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1862. On the trade of the Eastern Archipelago with New Guinea and its islands. Journal of the Royal Geographical Society 32: 127-137.   Text   Image   PDF
European luxuries of sugar, biscuit, preserved fruits, and wine, were to be obtained in small quantities, but at very moderate prices, and there was generally no advance made on the Singapore or Macassar rates, the dealers trusting to the profit obtained on the produce taken in exchange from the native buyers. Cockfighting and football-playing (in which the Bugis are very expert) took place almost every evening in the widest part of the street; and though quarrels sometimes occur and creeses are drawn
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S067    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1862. Narrative of search after Birds of Paradise. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1862 (27 May): 153-161.   Text   Image   PDF
country only to get Birds of Paradise, of which they know he can buy plenty at Ternate, Macassar, or Singapore.It thus happened that when Mr. Allen arrived at Sorong and explained his intentions of going to seek Birds of Paradise in the interior, innumerable objections were raised. He was told it was three or four days' journey over swamps and mountains; that the mountaineers were savages and cannibals, who would certainly kill him; and, lastly, that not a man in the village could be found who
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S096    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1865. On the phenomena of variation and geographical distribution as illustrated by the Papilionidæ of the Malayan Region. Transactions of the Linnean Society of London 25 (part I): 1-71, pls.1-8.   Text   Image   PDF
♀. Upper side of a browner colour; two orange-brown ocelli at the anal angle. Under side: the lunules and ocelli all larger; the two intermediate ones entirely absent, as in the male. Expanse of wings 5½–5¾ inches. Hab. Macassar, Menado (Celebes) (Wall.). 58. PAPILIO ISWARA, White.P. Iswara, White, Entom. 1842, p. 280; Doub. and Hew. Gen. of Diurn. Lep. pl. 2. f. 1 (♀). Hab. Penang, Malacca, Singapore, Borneo (♂, ♀) (Wall.). 59. PAPILIO HYSTASPES, Felder.P. Hystaspes, Feld. Lep. Nov. Philipp
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S096    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1865. On the phenomena of variation and geographical distribution as illustrated by the Papilionidæ of the Malayan Region. Transactions of the Linnean Society of London 25 (part I): 1-71, pls.1-8.   Text   Image   PDF
78. PAPILIO GODARTII, Montrouzier.P. Godartii, Montr. Ann. Soc. d' Agric. de Lyon, 1856, p. 394. Hab. Woodlark Island.Remark.—Closely allied to the last; perhaps a variation only. k. Demolion group. 79. PAPILIO DEMOLION, Cramer.P. Demolion, Cr. Pap. Ex. t. 89. f. A, B; P. Cresphontes, Fabr.; Boisd. Gén. Lép. p. 220. Hab. Java, Borneo, Sumatra, Singapore (Wall.), Moulmein (Brit. Mus.). 80. PAPILIO GIGON, n. s. Tab. VII. fig. 6 (♀). P. Gigon, List of Papilionidæ in Brit. Mus. p. 27 (no
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S096    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1865. On the phenomena of variation and geographical distribution as illustrated by the Papilionidæ of the Malayan Region. Transactions of the Linnean Society of London 25 (part I): 1-71, pls.1-8.   Text   Image   PDF
been applied to this species having been preoccupied, I have named it after the first describer. 95. PAPILIO LEUCOTHOË, Westwood.P. Leucothoë, Westw. Arc. Ent. pl. 79. f. 3; P. Xenocles, var., Brit. Mus. List of Pap. Hab. Singapore, Malacca (Wall.), N. India. 96. PAPILIO MACAREUS, Godart.P. Macareus, Godt. Enc. Méth. ix. pl. 76; Horsf. Desc. Cat. Lep. E. I. C. pl. 5. f. 1; Boisd. Sp. Gén. Lép. p. 374. P. striatus, Zink. Beitr. Ins. Java, t. 14. f. 5. Hab. Malaeea (Wall.), Java (Horsfield
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S096    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1865. On the phenomena of variation and geographical distribution as illustrated by the Papilionidæ of the Malayan Region. Transactions of the Linnean Society of London 25 (part I): 1-71, pls.1-8.   Text   Image   PDF
insect. Fig. 1. Papilio Pammon; a male, from Malacca. Fig. 3. The first form of female, closely resembling the male, from India. Fig. 5. The second form of female (P. Polytes, L.), from Singapore. This is the most common and widely distributed form of female, occurring everywhere with the male. Fig. 6. The third form of female (P. Romulus, Cr.), from India. [page] 7
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S102    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1864. On the parrots of the Malayan Region, with remarks on their habits, distribution, and affinities, and the descriptions of two wew species. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1864 (28 June): 272-295, 1 map.   Text   Image   PDF
probably brought from the Nicobar Islands, which I consider the western limit of the Malayan region 6. PSITTINUS. 22. PSITTINUS INCERTUS. Psittacus incertus, Shaw, Nat. Miscell. pl. 769. P. malaccensis, Lath.; Wagl. Mon. p. 630; Sw. Zool. Ill. pl. 154. Hab. Malay Peninsula, Singapore, Sumatra, and Borneo (A. R. W.). Remarks. This species is the most abundant of the Parrots of the western Malay countries. The genus has undoubted affinities to Palœornis. 7. GEOFFROYUS. 23. GEOFFROYUS PERSONATUS
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S109    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1865. List of the land shells Collected by Mr. Wallace in the Malay Archipelago, with descriptions of the new species by Mr. Henry Adams. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1865: 405-416, pl. 21.   Text   Image   PDF
.). 8. NANINA WALLACEI, Pfr. Hab. Macassar (Celebes) (Wall.). 9. NANINA LUCTUOSA, Beck. Hab. Ceram; Goram; Batchian (Wall.). Brown-black variety, Aru Islands (Wall.). Remark. On foliage. 10. NANINA IGNESCENS, Pfr. Hab. Batchian (Wall.). Pale and brown varieties. Remark. Found on foliage. 11. NANINA TUMENS, Desh. Hab. Timor (Wall.). 12. HEMIPLECTA HUMPHREYSIANA, Lea. Hab. Singapore (Wall.). 13. HEMIPLECTA SCHUMACHERIANA, Pfr. Hab. Borneo (Wall.). 14. HEMIPLECTA PEASEANA, Pfr. Hab. Bouru; Timor
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S109    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1865. List of the land shells Collected by Mr. Wallace in the Malay Archipelago, with descriptions of the new species by Mr. Henry Adams. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1865: 405-416, pl. 21.   Text   Image   PDF
. Sarawak (Borneo) (Wall.). Remark. Among fallen leaves in the mountain forests. 25. ? RYSSOTA REGALIS, Bens. Hab. Borneo (Wall.). Remark. Found in the swamps of Nipa-palm. 26. ? RYSSOTA JANUS, Chem. Hab. Malacca (Wall.). 27. ? RYSSOTA NASUTA, Met. Hab. Borneo (Wall.). HELICIDæ. HELICELLINæ. 28. TROCHOMORPHA LYCHNIA, Bens. Hab. Malacca (Wall.); Singapore (Bens.). Remark. Found on rotten trunks. 29. TROCHOMORPHA CONICOIDES, Met. Hab. Borneo (Wall.). Remark. Found on rotten trunks. 30. TROCHOMORPHA
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S156    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1873. Introduction. In: Smith, Frederick. 1873. A catalogue of the Aculeate Hymenoptera and Ichneumonidæ of India and the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Linnean Society, Zoology 11: 285-302.   Text   Image   PDF
which I made my collections.I reached Singapore at the end of April 1854, and spent six months between that island and the district of Malacca. In Singapore I chiefly collected at a spot about the centre of the island, where the low hills are crowned with patches of the lofty virgin forest that a few years before extended over the whole island. I also spent a week on the small island of Pulo-ubim, in the strait to the north of Singapore. The richness of these localities may be estimated from the
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S156    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1873. Introduction. In: Smith, Frederick. 1873. A catalogue of the Aculeate Hymenoptera and Ichneumonidæ of India and the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Linnean Society, Zoology 11: 285-302.   Text   Image   PDF
near 300 were Longicornes, and 216 species of Aculeate Hymenoptera, will give some idea of my collections in this spot.After a considerable delay in Singapore, waiting for a vessel, I visited the island of Lombock, which, being highly cultivated and possessing little forest vegetation, produced a very scanty harvest of insects—especially as my two months' stay there was chiefly occupied in obtaining the birds of the island, which were very numerous and interesting. At length, in September 1856, I
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S156    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1873. Introduction. In: Smith, Frederick. 1873. A catalogue of the Aculeate Hymenoptera and Ichneumonidæ of India and the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Linnean Society, Zoology 11: 285-302.   Text   Image   PDF
observed the larvæ of a small Homopterous insect (a species of Cercopidæ?), the perfect insects being found on the same plant. F. cruda and F. coxalis were found under bark; F. pallida had its nest under stones on the mountains of Celebes. The large Formica gigas is common in the forests of Singapore and Borneo among dead leaves and rotten timber. F. dorycus, an almost equally large species, was only taken at night, visiting my sugar-basin in New Guinea. Most of the other species of Formica were
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S156    Periodical contribution:     Wallace, A. R. 1873. Introduction. In: Smith, Frederick. 1873. A catalogue of the Aculeate Hymenoptera and Ichneumonidæ of India and the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Linnean Society, Zoology 11: 285-302.   Text   Image   PDF
houses. X. latipes makes long round holes in dead trees. The beautiful X. cærulea is common about the town of Singapore.True honey-bees are found in the western half of the archipelago, and in the south-east as far as Timor, where, however, it is possible they may have been introduced. A. dorsata and A. testacea both construct large combs suspended from the underside of the branches of lofty forest-trees. They sting very severely; [page] 29
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S725    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1891. Natural selection and tropical nature: Essays on descriptive and theoretical biology. London: Macmillan.   Text   Image   PDF
conditions. Whether we are at Singapore or Batavia, in the Moluccas or New Guinea, at Para, at the sources of the Rio Negro, or on the Upper Amazon, the equatorial climate is essentially the same, and we have no reason to believe that it materially differs in Guinea or the Congo. In certain localities, however, a more contrasted wet and dry season prevails, with a somewhat greater range of the thermometer. This is generally associated with a sandy soil, and a less dense forest, or with an open
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S725[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1895. Natural selection and tropical nature: Essays on descriptive and theoretical biology. London: Macmillan.   Text   Image   PDF
conditions. Whether we are at Singapore or Batavia, in the Moluccas or New Guinea, at Para, at the sources of the Rio Negro, or on the Upper Amazon, the equatorial climate is essentially the same, and we have no reason to believe that it materially differs in Guinea or the Congo. In certain localities, however, a more contrasted wet and dry season prevails, with a somewhat greater range of the thermometer. This is generally associated with a sandy soil, and a less dense forest, or with an open
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
books, and had spent much of my spare time at the British Museum, examining the collections, and making notes and sketches of the rarer and more valuable species of birds, butterflies, and beetles of the various Malay islands. It was, I believe, in the latter part of January, 1854, that I received a notification from the Government that a passage had been granted me to Singapore in the brig Frolic, shortly sailing for that port, and that I was to communicate with the captain Commander Nolloth
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
work again till six: coffee. Then read or talk, or, if insects very numerous, work again till eight or nine. Then to bed. Charles was a boy of sixteen whom I had brought with me from London as he wished to become a collector. He remained with me about a year and a half and eventually got employment on some of the plantations near Singapore. I next made an expedition to Malacca which I describe in one of my letters as follows: I have now just returned to Singapore after two months' hard work
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
yet firm, treating their manners, customs, and prejudices with respect, yet introducing everywhere European law, order, and industry. Singapore, January 20, 1862. I cannot write more now. I do not know how long I shall be here; perhaps a month. Then, ho! for England! While waiting at Singapore for the steamer to take me home I purchased two living specimens of the smaller bird of paradise. They were in a large cage, and the price asked was enormous. As they had never been seen alive in Europe I
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
CHAPTER XII THE MALAY ARCHIPELAGO (1854 1858) MY wanderings and adventures in the far East have been recorded in my book The Malay Archipelago. I will therefore give here but a brief outline with a few extracts from my letters and references to subjects of special interest. I remained at Singapore for several months collecting insects and birds in the forests around. In a letter home I give a short account of my daily life at this time: I will tell you how my day is now occupied. Get up at
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
, its spice-trees, and its waterfall, and on down the Straits of Malacca, with its richly wooded shores, to our destination, Singapore, where I was to begin the eight years of wandering throughout the Malay Archipelago, which constituted the central and controlling incident of my life. [page 175
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
beautiful ferns and pitcher-plants, of which I made a small collection. Elephants and rhinoceroses, as well as tigers, are abundant there, but we had our usual bad luck in seeing only their tracks. On returning to Malacca I found the accumulation of two or three posts a dozen letters, and about fifty newspapers. hellip; I am glad to be safe in Singapore with my collections, as from here they can be insured. I have now a fortnight's work to arrange, examine, and pack them, and four months hence
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
wholesale murder and butchery of unoffending tribes to secure his own power! In my next letter (from Singapore in February, 1856) I say I have now left Sarawak, where I began to feel quite at home, and may perhaps never return to it again, but I shall always look back with [page] 18
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
Timor and Singapore, Mr. Frederick Geach, the mining engineer, came home from the East, and we became very intimate, and saw a good deal of each other. He was a Cornishman, and familiar with tin, lead, [page] 36
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
was properly washed. In order to obtain water in ample quantity for building and also for garden and other purposes, I had a well sunk about a hundred feet into a water-bearing stratum of the chalk, and purchased a small iron windmill with a two-inch force pump to obtain the water. I made two small concrete ponds in the garden one close to the windmill and a large tank at the top of a low tower to supply house water. My friend Geach, the mining engineer whom I had met in Timor and Singapore, was
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S729[2d]    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1908. My life: A record of events and opinions. New edition, condensed and revised. London: Chapman & Hall.   Text   PDF
gigantea, 277, 281 Sexual selection, 236 Sheffield, lecture in, 299 Shipwreck, 152 159 Silent monitor, R. Owen's, 54 Silk, George, letters to, 21, 74,171, 199 Silsoe and Wray Park, 67 Sims, Mr., lodge with, at Neath, 133 Singapore, life at, 175 Sketches while at Leicester school, 129 Slate quarries, bad investment in, 359 Slate-writing under test conditions, 352 Slater, Mr. M. B., Dr. Spruce's executor, 314 Sleigh, Frances, a possible relative, 2 Smoking, experiences of, 59, 79 Snowdon, the ancient
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
LIST OF PLATES IN VOLUME I A. R. WALLACE (1912) Photogravure Frontispiece FACING PAGE A. R. WALLACE (SINGAPORE, 1862) 36 A. R. WALLACE'S MOTHER 48 A. R. WALLACE SOON AFTER HIS RETURN FROM THE EAST 142 [page xii
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
two months, and then return to Singapore to prepare for a voyage to Cambodia or somewhere else, so do not be alarmed if you do not hear from me regularly. Love to all. Your affectionate son, ALFRED R. WALLACE. TO HIS MOTHER Singapore. September 30, 1854. My dear Mother, I last wrote to you from Malacca in July. I have now just returned to Singapore after two months' hard work. At Malacca I had a pretty strong touch of fever with the old Rio Negro symptoms, but the Government doctor made me take a
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
and can talk to them in the general language of the place. The streets of Singapore on a fine day are as crowded and busy as Tottenham Court Road, and from the variety of nations and occupations for more interesting. I am more convinced than ever that no one can appreciate a new country in a short visit. After two years in the country I only now begin to understand Singapore and to marvel at the life and bustle, the varied occupations, and strange population, on a spot which so short a time
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
part of it (with the exception of the Island of Java) had been explored, it offered unlimited attractions for his special work. But as the journey out would be an expensive one, he was advised to lay his plans before Sir Roderick Murchison, then President of the Royal Geographical Society, and it was through his kindly interest and personal application to the Government that a passage was provided in one of the P. and O. boats going to Singapore. He left early in 1854. Arrived at Singapore, an
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
now about a thousand beetles to Mr. Stevens, and I have as many other insects still on hand which will form part of my next and principal consignment. Singapore is very rich in beetles, and before I leave I think I shall have a most beautiful collection. I will tell you how my day is now occupied. Get up at half past five. Bath and coffee. Sit down to arrange and put away my insects of the day before, and set them safe out to dry. Charles mending nets, filling pincushions, and getting ready
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
gatherings that he first met Huxley, and he also had a vague recollection of once meeting and speaking to Darwin at the British Museum. Had it not been for his extreme shyness of disposition, and (according to his own estimation) lack of conversational powers, he would doubtless have become far more widely known, and have enjoyed the friendship of not a few of the eminent men who shared his interests, during this interval before starting on his journey to Singapore. It was due to his close study of
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
justice to. . . . Yours sincerely, ALFRED R. WALLACE. TO HIS MOTHER Singapore. April 30, 1854. My dear Mother, We arrived here safe on the 20th of this month, having had very fine weather all the voyage. On shore I was obliged to go to a hotel, which was very expensive, so I tried to get out into the country as soon as I could, which, however, I did not manage in less than a week, when I at last got permission to stay with a French Roman Catholic missionary who lives about eight miles out of the
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
am glad to be safe in Singapore with my collections, as from here they can be insured. I have now fortnight's work to arrange, examine, and pack them, and then in four months hence there will be some work for Mr. Stevens. Sir James Brooke is here. I have called on him. He received me most cordially, and offered me every assistance at Sarawak. I shall go there next, as the missionary does not go to Cambodia for some months. Besides, I shall have some pleasant society at Sarawak, and shall get on
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
soon. That ought to make my name a little known. I have not your talent at making acquaintances, and find Singapore very dull. I have not found a single companion. I long for you to walk about with and observe the queer things in the streets of Singapore. The Chinamen and their ways are inexhaustibly amusing. My revolver is too heavy for daily use. I wish I had had a small one. Yours sincerely, ALFRED R. WALLACE. TO AN UNKNOWN CORRESPONDENT1 Si Munjon Coal Works, Borneo. May, 1855. One of the
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
insects, besides birds, shells, quadrupeds, and plants. The day I arrived here a vessel sailed for Macassar, and I fear I shall not have another chance for two months unless I go a roundabout way, and perhaps not then, so I have hardly made up my mind what to do. Your affectionate brother, ALFRED R. WALLACE. TO HIS BROTHER IN-LAW, THOMAS SIMS Singapore. [Probably about March, 1856.] Dear Thomas, . . . You and Fanny talk of my coming back for a trifling sore as if I was within an omnibus ride of
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
months' residence in the country, he left his young assistant, Charles Allen, there. He entered my service, and remained some time after the formation of the Borneo Company. Later, he again joined Wallace, and then went to New Guinea, doing valuable collecting and exploring work. He finally settled in Singapore, where I met him in 1899. He had married and was doing well; but died not long after my interview with him. He had come to the East with Wallace as a lad of 16, and had been his faithful
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
. I am very unfortunate with my watch. I dropped it on board and broke the balance-spring, and have now sent it home to Mr. Matthews to repair, as I cannot trust anyone here to do it. . . . Love to Fanny and Thomas. I remain your affectionate son, ALFRED R. WALLACE. TO HIS MOTHER Bukit Tama, Singapore. May 28, 1854. My dear Mother, I send you a few lines through G. Silk as I thought you would like to hear from me. I am very comfortable here living with a Roman Catholic missionary. . . . I send
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
! and in the United States, California, and India got subscriptions sufficient to complete it. It is a curious and not very creditable thing that in the English colonies of Singapore and Malacca there is not a single Protestant missionary; while the conversion, education and physical and moral improvement of the inhabitants (non-European) is entirely left to these French missionaries, who without the slightest assistance from our Government devote their lives to the Christianising and civilising
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
have a vast influence on the progress of commerce and civilisation of Borneo and the surrounding countries. India, Australia, and every country with which they have communication must also be incalculably benefited by an abundant supply of good coal within two days' steam of Singapore. Let us wish success, then, to the Si Munjon Coal Works! A. R. W. TO HIS SISTER, MRS. SIMS Sadong River Borneo]. June 25, 1855. My dear Fanny, . . . I am now obliged to keep fowls and pigs, or we should get nothing
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
! . . . Your ever affectionate son, ALFRED R. WALLACE. TO HIS SISTER, MRS. SIMS Singapore. February 20, 1856. My dear Fanny, . . . I have now left Sarawak, where I began to feel quite at home, and may perhaps never return to it again; but I shall always look back with pleasure to my residence there and to my acquaintance with Sir James Brooke, who is a gentleman and a nobleman in the noblest sense of both words. . . . Charles has left me. He has stayed with the Bishop of Sarawak, who wants
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
establishment of missionaries constantly kept up by fresh supplies who are taught the languages of the countries they are going to at Penang or Singapore. In China there are near a million Catholics, in Tonquin and Cochin China more than half a million! One secret of their success is the cheapness of their establishments. A missionary is allowed about 30 a year, on which he lives, in whatever country he may be. This has two good effects. A large number of missionaries can be employed with
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
to visit the interior and collect till November, and then work my way to Singapore so as to return home and arrive in the spring. Travelling here will be a much pleasanter business than in any other country I have visited, as there are good roads, regular posting stages, [page] 8
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
known of the birds of the Archipelago, except perhaps that of the Leyden Museum, who have had naturalists collecting for them in all the chief islands for many years with unlimited means. Give my kind love to mother, to whom I will write next time. Your affectionate brother, ALFRED R. WALLACE. To G. SILK1 Singapore. January 20, 1862. My dear George, ... On the question of marriage we probably differ much. I believe a good wife to be the greatest blessing a man can enjoy, and the only road to
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
much. The Rajah has sent me some of his pigeons and fowls and cats' skins from the interior of Borneo and from Singapore. Can you tell me positively that black jaguars or leopards are believed generally or always to pair with black? I do not think colour of offspring good evidence. Is the case of parrots fed on fat of fish turning colour mentioned in your Travels? I remember a case of parrots with (I think) poison from some toad put into hollow whence primaries had been removed. One of the
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
far in some cases, as with the stripes on the tiger. I have also this morning read an excellent abstract in the Gardeners Chronicle of your paper on nests;1 I was not by any means fully converted by your letter, but I think now I am so; and I hope it will be published somewhere in extenso. It strikes me as a capital generalisation, and appears to me even more original than it did at first. I have had an excellent and cautious letter from Mr. Geach of Singapore with some valuable answers on
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WS1.1    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 1.   Text
places one is always doubtful whether a dinner can be obtained. I have been a trip to the hills and stayed ten days in the clouds, but it was very wet, being the wrong season. . . . Having now paid you off my literary debts, I trust you will give me credit again for some long letters on things in general. Address now to care of Hamilton, Gray and Co., Singapore, and with love and remembrances to all friends, I remain, my dear Thomas, yours very faithfully, ALFRED R. WALLACE. P.S. . . . Will you
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WS1.2    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 2.   Text
, 113; enthusiasm for orchids, 114; his method of writing, 120 1, 243; and psychical research, 122, 167, 181 215, 239 40; daily routine, 123 4; sense of humour, 125 6, 132, 133, 134, 226, 227, 228; receives the Order of Merit, 127 9; his Sarawak spider, 131; failing health, 135 et seq.; death, 138, 252; funeral, 252; memorial in Westminster Abbey, 253 5; lists of writings, 257 Wallace, Alfred Russel, letters to his mother: announcing arrival at Singapore, i. 47; describing work at Singapore, 48; on
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WS1.2    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 2.   Text
his story is substantially true making allowance for his being a foreigner who learnt one system of measures, then lived thirty years among savages, and afterwards had to reproduce all his knowledge in English and Australian idioms. As an intelligent writer in the Saturday Review says, putting aside the sensational illustrations there is absolutely nothing in his story but what is quite possible and even probable. He must have reached Singapore the year after I returned home, and I dare say
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WS1.2    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 2.   Text
Insects used for Food by the Indians of the Amazon June 13 1853 Royal Geograph. Soc. The Rio Negro 1854 5 Zoologist Letters from Singapore and Borneo 1854 6 Trans. Entomol. Soc. Description of a New Species of Ornithoptera 1855 Annals and Mag. of Nat. Hist. On the Ornithology of Malacca 1855 Journ. Bot. Botany of Malacca 1855 Zoologist The Entomology of Malacca Sept. 1855 Annals and Mag. of Nat. Hist. On the Law which has regulated the Introduction of New Species 1856 Annals and Mag. of Nat. Hist
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WS1.2    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 2.   Text
Shrewsbury Grammar School, Darwin and, i. 12, 15 Sidgwick, Prof, and Mrs. H., telepathic experiments by, ii. 199, 200; Wallace’s remarks on, 200 1 Siege of the South Pole, Mill’s, ii. 82 Silk, George, i. 52, 87; Wallace’s friendship with, 10; walking tour in Switzerland with Wallace, 35 Sims, Mrs. (sister of A. R. Wallace), i. 30, 44, 56, 60, 62, 64, 85 Thomas, i. 63, 73 Singapore, Wallace at, i. 36 Slade, prosecution of, ii. 197 Sleeper, George W., ii. 98, 99, 100 Smedley, Mr. E., ii. 83, 100
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WS1.2    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 2.   Text
; interest in phrenology and mesmerism, 24, ii. 181, 182; studies beetles and butterflies, i. 24, 114; school teacher at Leicester, 24; voyage to Amazon, 26 et seq.; explores Uaup s River, 29; fire at sea and loss of collections, 29, 30; first meeting with Darwin, 35, 105, ii. 62; meets Huxley, i. 35; visits Switzerland, 35, ii. 204; visits Singapore, i. 36; on missionaries, 37 8, 47, 48, 50, 62 3; in Sarawak, 38 40; beetle and butterfly collecting, i. 38, 41 2, 114, 237, ii. 4 5; ill-health of, i
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WS1.2    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. London: Cassell. Volume 2.   Text
, Alfred Russel, letters to Mrs. Sims (his sister): on his assistant, i. 56, 60; on missionaries, 62; on life in Macassar, 64; on Java and its flora, 85 letters to Thomas Sims: on Singapore, i. 61; on monocular and binocular vision, Darwin’s Descent of Species, and belief and disbelief, 73 letters to Mr. E. Smedley: on Child’s Root Principles, ii. 83 4, 100 1; on prayer, 163; on Mars, 175; on horoscope, 215 letter to Dr. Edwin Smith, on Spiritualism, ii. 210 letter to Mr. C. G. Stuart-Menteith
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WS10    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1859. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray.   Text
and Opinions of General Sir Charles Napier; chiefly derived from his Journals, Letters, and Familiar Correspondence. Second Edition. Portraits. 4 Vols. Post 8vo. 48s. NAUTICAL ALMANACK (The). Royal 8vo. 2s. 6d. (Published by Authority.) NAVY LIST (The Quarterly). (Published by Authority.) Post 8vo. 2s. 6d. NEWBOLD'S (LIEUT.) Straits of Malacca, Penang, and Singapore. 2 Vols. 8vo. 26s. NEWDEGATE'S (C. N.) Customs' Tariffs of all Nations; collected and arranged up to the year 1855. 4to. 30s
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WS14    Periodical contribution:     Ellesmere, Earl of. 1855. Address to the Royal Geographical Society of London; delivered at the Anniversary meeting on the 28th May, 1855. Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London 25: cxv.   Text   PDF
Wallace Online [page] cxv It will be remembered that, on the recommendation of the Council, Mr. Wallace, upon his return from South America, was kindly provided by the Earl of Clarendon with a free passage to the East; and a communication has since arrived announcing his arrival at Singapore. From Singapore he went to Malacca, where he visited several parts of the interior, including Mount Ophir, which he ascended, and, by means of careful observations with Adie's sympiesometer, ascertained to
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WS14    Periodical contribution:     Ellesmere, Earl of. 1855. Address to the Royal Geographical Society of London; delivered at the Anniversary meeting on the 28th May, 1855. Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London 25: cxv.   Text   PDF
Wallace Online [page] cxv It will be remembered that, on the recommendation of the Council, Mr. Wallace, upon his return from South America, was kindly provided by the Earl of Clarendon with a free passage to the East; and a communication has since arrived announcing his arrival at Singapore. From Singapore he went to Malacca, where he visited several parts of the interior, including Mount Ophir, which he ascended, and, by means of careful observations with Adie's sympiesometer, ascertained to
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WS9    Book:     Anonymous. 1860. Catalogue of books, in the Singapore Library, with regulations and by-laws. Singapore: Printed at the Mission Press, by J.F. Hansen.   Text
RULES AND BY-LAWS OF THE Singapore Library. [MANAGING COMMITTEE
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WS9    Book:     Anonymous. 1860. Catalogue of books, in the Singapore Library, with regulations and by-laws. Singapore: Printed at the Mission Press, by J.F. Hansen.   Text
Wallace Online [title page] Catalogue of Books, IN THE SINGAPORE LIBRARY, WITH Regulations and By-Laws. SEPTEMBER 1860. Price 50 Cents. Singapore: PRINTED AT THE MISSION PRESS, BY J, F, HANSEN. [page 1
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WS9    Book:     Anonymous. 1860. Catalogue of books, in the Singapore Library, with regulations and by-laws. Singapore: Printed at the Mission Press, by J.F. Hansen.   Text
SINGAPORE LIBRARY. GENERAL RULES. REVISED TO 15TH OCTOBER, 1857. I. Each Proprietor on his admission shall pay a contribution of Forty Spanish dollars. II. All persons who may hereafter desire to become Proprietors shall make application to the Secretary, who shall immediately prepare a Circular notifying the application to the Committee, and circulate the same to the members of the Committee for their votes; when, if the assent of three-fourths of the members shall be signed on the said
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WS9    Book:     Anonymous. 1860. Catalogue of books, in the Singapore Library, with regulations and by-laws. Singapore: Printed at the Mission Press, by J.F. Hansen.   Text
. Haliburton 2 109. Selections of Grave and Gay from the Writings of Thomas De Quincey 2 110. Shakspere's Corrections by Collier, an Inquiry; by N. E. S. A. Hamilton. 1 111. Siamese Grammar; by Captain James Low 1 112. Singapore Free Press for 1845-52 8 113. Sisters of Charity, Catholic and Protestant; by Mrs. Jameson 1 114. Sleep (Philosophy of); by Dr. R. Medhurst 1 115. Straits Times for 1845-52 8 116. Summer and Winter in the Pyrenees; by Mrs. Ellis. 1 117. SunnyMemories of Foreign Lands; by Mrs. H.B
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WS9    Book:     Anonymous. 1860. Catalogue of books, in the Singapore Library, with regulations and by-laws. Singapore: Printed at the Mission Press, by J.F. Hansen.   Text
send a bill for the current month's subscription, and shall not give out any books until the same is paid. XVIII. Proprietors (when resident in Singapore) and subscribers of Class I shall pay Two dollars, and subscribers of Class II shall pay One dollar monthly. XIX. A fee of Five dollars shall be payable for the benefit of Library on the transfer of every share, whether by purchase or gift. Such fee to be paid by the party to whom the share is transferred. XX. Subscribers of Class II shall not be
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WSPEC004    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1863. An attempt at a classification of the Eumolpidae. Journal of Entomology, London, 2 (9): 143-163.   Text   Image   PDF
episternum. Mesosternum subquadrate, its apex dilated, obtuse. Type, Stasimus rugosus, Baly. Singapore. Stasimus may be separated from all other allied forms by its gibbous thorax, tuberculate elytra, and peculiar antenn . The single species forming the genus is a native of Singapore. Stasimus rugosus, Baly. S. oblong, subcylindrical, opake, fuscous; head rugose, closely covered with suberect paler hairs; thorax rugose, strongly gibbous in front; elytra deeply punctured, the puncturing arranged in
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WSPEC004    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1863. An attempt at a classification of the Eumolpidae. Journal of Entomology, London, 2 (9): 143-163.   Text   Image   PDF
; Leprotes, Hongkong; Demotina, China, Ceylon, and the Malay archipelago; and Aulacolepis, Siam and Sumatra; together with the six following, peculiar to the Malay archipelago itself: viz., Aulexis, Piomera, Metaxis, Apolepis, to Borneo; Stasimus, to Singapore; and Lepina, to Sumatra, Java, and Pulo Penang. In North America are found (in addition to Adoxus) Xanthonia and Fidia. South America contains an equal number of species with the last, belonging to the genera Habrophora and Brevicolaspis
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
fulvis, extrorsum nigris. Long. 2 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head distantly punctured, epistome much broader than long, sides rounded and converging backwards, apical border obsolete, middle portion of the anterior margin broadly subangulate-emarginate, surface more coarsely and closely punctured than the front; antenn filiform, six outer joints black. Thorax nearly three times as broad as long; sides nearly straight and parallel at the base, thence obliquely rounded and converging to the apex; above
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
27. Colaspoides parvula, n. sp. Breviter ovata, convexa, postice paullo attenuata, pallide fulvopicea, nitida; pedibus antennisque obscure fulvis; thorace tenuiter remote punctato; elytris subcrebre seriatim punctatis; mandibulis nigris. Long. 1 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head smooth, impunctate; epistome much longer than broad, lanceolate, its apex very acute, sides sinuate in front, not distinctly separated from the rest of the face, the sutural lines being only visible under a strong lens
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
cyaneis. Hab. Java, Sumatra, Singapore; var. B, Penang, Tringanee, Siam; var. C, Borneo. 2. Aspidolopha imperialis, n. sp. Oblonga, crassa, subcylindrica, fulva, nitida, subtus dense aureosericea; mandibularum apice antennisque (his basi exceptis) nigris, fronte, scutello, elytrorumque fasciis duabus latis, harum prim baseos, communi, basi fulvo-binotat , margine postico utrinque profunde emarginat , secund vix pone medium posit , utrinque abbreviat , obscure c ruleis. (Fœm.) Var. A. Elytrorum
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
vix transversim impressis, tenuiter punctato-striatis, striis ad apicem distinctis, interspatiis planis, apice obsolete convexiusculis. Long. 4 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head deeply constricted behind the eyes, the latter prominent, deeply notched; face triangular; antenn filiform, nearly three-fourths the length of the body. Thorax scarcely broader than long; its sides moderately constricted; above smooth, a longitudinal space down the middle impressed with a number of very fine punctures; just in
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
elytris planis, mediocriter punctato-striatis, interstitiis subtilissime alutaceis, postice elevatis. (Lacordaire.) Long. 2 lin. Hab. Singapore; also Bengal, China. My specimens of this insect differ somewhat from the one from Bengal (which I have not seen) described in Lacordaire's work; mine have the abdomen almost, in one case, entirely black in one specimen, also, the anterior legs are piceous; in all, the anterior half of the elytra is distinctly rugulose, and the basilar space is bounded
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
B. Subelongata, parallela. Crioceris crassicornis, Oliv. Ent. vi. p. 731, 6, pl. i. fig. 6. Crioceris castanea, Lac. Mon. Phyt. i. p. 564. Crioceris omophloides, Lac., ibid. a. Corpore nigro, elytris rufo-fulvis aut rufis. b. Corpore nigro aut piceo; capite, thorace elytrisque obscure fulvis. Hab. Borneo, Malacca (Singapore), Java, Amboina, Manilla, Bouro; also Ceylon, Siam, the whole continent of India, China. This insect is one of the most abundant and widely spread in the present genus
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
, extus ramulum perpendiculare fere ad basin emittente, fasci que lat subapicali utrinque abbreviat , flavis. Long. 2 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head rather longer than in the last species; a large triangular space on either side between the eyes, separating the epistome and front, finely rugose and covered with fine adpressed whitish sericeous hairs; epistome and front nearly smooth, shining, glabrous; three or four lower joints of antenn pale fulvous beneath. Thorax nearly three times as broad as
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
forms by the gibbous thorax, tuberculated elytra, and peculiar antenn . 1. Stasimus rugosus, Baly. (Pl. IV. fig. 2.) Journ. of Entom. ii. p. 150. Oblongus, subcylindricus, opacus, fuscus; thorace rugoso, dorso ante medium gibboso; elytris profunde punctatis, punctis in striis irregulariter dispositis, interspatiis incrassatis, hic illic tuberculis verrucosis instructis. Long. 2 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head rugose, closely covered with suberect pale hairs, epistome transverse, triangular, its surface
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
the scutellum; apical border of thorax obscure fulvous. Elytra closely and coarsely punctured, obsoletely depressed below the basilar space. 2. Aulexis Wallacei, n. sp. (Pl. IV. fig. 5.) Elongata, parallela, fusco-fulva, nitida, pilis suberectis concoloribus dense vestita; capite (antennis labroque exceptis) thoraceque nigris, pilis griseis obsitis, hoc utrinque pone medium oblique excavato. Long. 3 lin. Hab. Sarawak, Singapore, Penang, Tondano. [page] 8
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
, pilis squamiformibus adpressis concoloribus dense vestitus, supra nigro-setosus; labro antennarumque basi fulvis, his extrorsum piceis; capite thoraceque crebre rugoso-punctatis; elytris profunde punctatis, punctis marginis substriatim dispositis. Long. 3 lin. Hab. Singapore. Body above closely covered with adpressed squamiform cupreous pubescence, intermixed with which are numerous long erect black hairs. Head rugose-punctate, anterior border of epistome angulate-emarginate; antenn more than half
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
dilatat , nigr ; frontis margine antico utrinque sinuato, medio rotundato-producto, angulis lateralibus obtusis. Long. 3 lin. Hab. Singapore. VOL. IV. THIRD SERIES, PART II. JULY, 1867. K [page] 11
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
; thorace remote subtenuiter punctato; elytris viridi- neis, viridi-c ruleo-limbatis, infra basin sat profunde excavatis, punctato-striatis, striis confuse bifariam dispositis, interspatiis apice elevatis, intra marginem exteriorem costatis; antennis clav sat valde dilatat , obscure purpure ; frontis margine antico truncato, medio angulato-producto, utrinque sinuato. Long. 3 lin. Hab. Singapore. This insect is so nearly allied to C. fraternus, (differing chiefly in the form of the lower border
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
fulvis, clav sat late dilatat , purpureo-nigr ; frontis margine antico obtuse angulato, angulis lateralibus distinctis. Long. 3 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head coarsely punctured, front impressed in the middle with [page] 12
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
7. Colaspoides simillima, n. sp. Anguste oblonga aut oblonga, parallela, convexa, cuprea, nitida, subtus piceo-cuprea; antennis nigris, his basi, labro palpisque obscure fulvis; thorace subcrebre punctato; elytris intra marginem lateralem longitudinaliter excavatis, infra basin transversim excavatis, subfortiter subseriatim punctatis, interspatiis planis. Var. A. Elytrorum striis minus distinctis. Long. 3 lin. Hab. Malacca, Tringanee. Var. A, Singapore. Smaller and less elongate than C. cuprea
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
, sulcatis, interspatiis costatis, punctis disco exteriori confusis, interspatiis incrassatis, irregulariter reticulatis. Long. 2 lin. Hab. Malacca, Singapore. Head distantly punctured, front impressed with a short longitudinal groove; epistome wedge-shaped, sides straight and converging backwards, apical border obsolete; middle of anterior margin subangulate-emarginate; surface coarsely and irregularly punctured; supra-orbital groove deeply impressed, its lower [page] 14
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
margin, contract as they approach the apex into single rows, the interspaces between them being thickened and forming indistinct cost . 26. Colaspoides picea, n. sp. Oblonga, convexa, pallide picea, nitida; femorum apicibus tibiisque obscurioribus; thorace tenuiter punctato; elytris confuse seriatim punctatis. Long. 1 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head smooth, nearly impunctate; epistome not longer than broad, sides rounded, apical margin obsolete, anterior border concave-emarginate; surface distinctly
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
medium l vibus, convexiusculis, ad apicem subcostatis; sutur antice discique maculis subelevatis nonnullis purpureo-cupreis. Long. 2 lin. Hab. Borneo, Singapore. Head coarsely punctured, convex; face between the eyes impressed with a short longitudinal groove; anterior edge of epistome angularly notched; antenn shorter than half the length of the body, entirely black. Thorax transversely convex; sides rounded, slightly converging from behind the middle to the apex; upper surface closely
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
integris, ante medium sat fortiter, pone medium tenuiter punctatis, interspatiis planis; femoribus subtus dente minuto armatis. Long. 1 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head moderately exserted, very remotely punctured; epistome forming a single piece with the front, its anterior border concave-emarginate, angles of the notch produced, acute; encarp separated from the front by a deep groove; front itself impressed in the middle with a short longitudinal groove; antenn slender, filiform, nearly equal to the body
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
prope suturam obsolete convexiusculis, disco intermedio planis, prope marginem exteriorem costatis; femoribus incrassatis, muticis; tarsis fulvis. Long. 1 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head short, coarsely punctured; anterior border of epistome concave-emarginate; labrum black; antenn filiform, black, fulvous at the base; encarp thickened, separated from the front by a shallow groove. Thorax nearly twice as broad at the base as long; sides rounded and converging from base to apex; above transversely
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
, nitidum, subtus (cum antennis) nigro-piceum; antennarum basi, tibiis tarsisque pallide rufo-piceis; thorace crebre foveolato-punctato; elytris thorace vix latioribus, infra basin non excavatis, profunde fovcolato-striatis, interspatiis subcostatis; femoribus subtus dente brevi armatis. Long. 2 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head prominent, coarsely and deeply punctured, interspaces on either side the vertex indistinctly reticulate-strigose, those on the lower part of the front obsoletely transversely
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
. Ovata, convexa, postice attenuata, subtus (cum capite et antennis) pallide picea, nitida, supra nigro-picea; thorace sparse hic illic tenuiter punc ato; elytris subfortiter punctato-striatis, striis bifariam dispositis, interspatiis ad latera costatis; tibiis intermediis extus ad apicem emarginatis. Long. 1 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head flat, nearly impunctate; anterior border of the epistome angularly notched; jaws black; antenn rather more than half the length of the body, pale fulvous. Thorax
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
. cit. Elongata, fulvo-flava, nitida; antennis, genibus, abdomineque nigris, hoc flavo-marginato; thorace fusco-notato; elytris fuscis vel piceis, utrisque pustulis pallide fulvis octo vel novem ornatis. Var. A. Thoracis maculis obsoletis. Long. 3 lin. Hab. Pulo-Penang, Malacca, Singapore; also Ceylon, Australia. Thorax transversely convex; sides straight and parallel behind [page] 28
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
, convexa, nigro-c rulea, nitida; thoracis lateribus, pectore, abdominis limbo, elytrisque rufis; thorace basi crebre, disco sparse punctato; elytris punctato-striatis, striis pone medium confusis, sutur ad apicem et infra basin dilatat , fasciisque latis undulatis duabus, un ante, alter pone medium positis, nigro-cyaneis. Var. A. Line suturali in medio interrupt . Long. 4 lin. Hab. Java, Singapore, Malacca, Timor. Similar in form to P. cyanipes; thorax more closely punctured at the base; anterior
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WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
. Flava, thorace nigro-quinque-notato, elytris cyaneo-maculatis. Var. A. Thoracis maculis plus minusve obsoletis. Var. B. Thorace toto nigro. Long. 5 lin. Hab. Java, Singapore; also Siam, China. Thorax twice as broad as long, sides slightly diverging from base to apex; surface somewhat irregularly punctured on the sides, smooth on the disk, marked with five black spots, a small one on either side near the middle of the lateral margin, a lunulate one on either side the middle disk, and the fifth
14%
WSPEC008    Periodical contribution:     Baly, Joseph Sugar. 1865. Phytophaga Malayana. Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, (series 3) 4: 1-300. .   Text   Image   PDF
punctato; elytris subcrebre fortiter punctatis, punctis subseriatim dispositis. Long. 2 lin. Hab. Singapore. Head triangular, front smooth, impressed in the middle with a shallow fovea, very minutely and distantly punctured, lower portion near the epistome coarsely and deeply punctured; epistome triangular, the sides nearly straight, converging backwards, the apex not separated from the face; anterior border produced into two short obtuse lobes, the space between them concave; surface impressed on its
39%
WSPEC029    Periodical contribution:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1865. A list of diurnal lepidoptera collected by MR. Wallace in the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society (Zoology), 8: 143-149.   Text   Image   PDF
SOSPITA SAVITRI (Abisara Savitri), Felder, Wien. Ent. Monats. Band iv. p. 397. Sospita Susa, Hewitson, Ex. But. vol. ii. pl. 46. fig. 2. Sumatra; Singapore. Gen. TAXILA, Doubleday. TAXILA DRUPADI. Emesis Drupadi, Horsfield, Cat. Lep. E. I. C. Museum, pl. 2. figs. 3, 3a. Malacca; Sumatra; Singapore. TAXILA ORPHNA, , Hewitson, Ex. But. vol. ii. pl. 45. fig. 7. Emesis Orphna, Boisduval, Sp. Gen. Lep. pl. 21. fig. 4. Female. Above rufous-brown; anterior wing with the outer half carmine, crossed
25%
WSPEC029    Periodical contribution:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1865. A list of diurnal lepidoptera collected by MR. Wallace in the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society (Zoology), 8: 143-149.   Text   Image   PDF
Gen. RAGADIA, Westwood. RAGADIA CRISIA, H bner, Zutr. figs. 675, 676. Sumatra; Java; Sarawak; Singapore. Gen. ERITES, Boisduval. ERITES MADURA, Horsfield, Cat. Lep. E. I. C. p. 5. figs. 8, 8 a. Var. Male and female. With five ocelli on the anterior wing, one large and four small. Sumatra; Singapore. Var. Male and female. With the five ocelli of the anterior wing small and of equal size. Singapore; Sarawak. This genus differs very slightly from Euptychia. Gen. MYCALESIS, H bner. MYCALESIS
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WSPEC029    Periodical contribution:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1865. A list of diurnal lepidoptera collected by MR. Wallace in the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society (Zoology), 8: 143-149.   Text   Image   PDF
. iii. figs. 7, 8. Mysol. SOSPITA ECHERIUS, Stoll, pl. 31. figs. 1, 1a, 1b. Macassar. Var. Male. Much larger and darker, the bands on the wings scarcely seen. Female with the transverse bands of the anterior wing broader, whiter, and nearer together. Menado. Var. S. (Abisara) Kausambi, Felder, Wien. Ent, Monats, Band iv. p. 397. Malacca; Sumatra; Singapore; Sarawak. There is a great difference in size between large examples of S. Echerius and S. Kausambi, but there is no other distinction. [page] 14
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WSPEC029    Periodical contribution:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1865. A list of diurnal lepidoptera collected by MR. Wallace in the Eastern Archipelago. Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society (Zoology), 8: 143-149.   Text   Image   PDF
figures 3 4, Oreas marmorea Leda (C. Helena, Westw.), of H bner's Sammlung, which I believe represent the male. From Bouru, Timor, Batchian, Ceram, Waigiou. Females of the above with the wings truncate, paler, and more ochreous on both sides, resembling Cramer's fig. A. pl. 292. From Bouru, Batchian, and Gilolo. Specimens of both sexes resembling figs. 1, 2, Oreas marmorea Leda, of the same plate of H bner s Sammlung. From Timor, Flores, Sumatra, and Singapore. Specimens of both sexes resembling fig
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WSPEC030    Book:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1862-1878. Illustrations of diurnal Lepidoptera, part I. Lycaenidae [text]. London.   Text   PDF
submarginal line, all black. Posterior wing with several spots, short lines in pairs, a submarginal line, and the outer margin black: the caudal black spots crowned with silvery blue. Exp.1 1/20 inch. In the Collection of A. R. Wallace, from Singapore. 12. Myrina Tharis. Oxylides Tharis, H bner, Zutr. f. 883, 884. Myrina Pharis, Doubleday in Brit Mus. List. Westwood in Doubleday Hewitson's Gen. Diurn. Lep. pl. 74. f. 3. In the Collection of W. C. Hewitson, from Malacca. 13. Myrina Chitra. Thecla
14%
WSPEC030    Book:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1862-1878. Illustrations of diurnal Lepidoptera, part I. Lycaenidae [text]. London.   Text   PDF
underside is nearly white, the third spot of the anterior wing scarcely seen. Exp. 1 13/20 inch. In the Collection of A. R. Wallace, from Singapore. 8. Deudorix Epijarbas. PLATE VII. figs. 16,18, 17. Thecla Epijarbas, Boisduval, MS. Aphn us Epijarbas, Doubleday, Brit. Mus. List. Dipsas Epijarbas, Moore, Cat. Lep. E. I. C. Mus. p. 32. In the Collections of A. R. Wallace and W. C. Hewitson, from Macassar and North India. 9. Deudorix Diovis, Hewitson. PLATE VII. figs. 10, ll, 12. UPPERSIDE. Male
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WSPEC030    Book:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1862-1878. Illustrations of diurnal Lepidoptera, part I. Lycaenidae [text]. London.   Text   PDF
rufous brown above, glossed with blue, does not differ from the male on the underside, except that the spots of the posterior wing are smaller and of somewhat different form. Exp.1 7/10 inch. In the Collections of the British Museum and A. R. Wallace, from Sarawak. Var. . With the transverse band of the underside narrower, straighter: the spot nearest the costal margin of the posterior wing linear. From Singapore. [page] 2
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WSPEC030    Book:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1862-1878. Illustrations of diurnal Lepidoptera, part I. Lycaenidae [text]. London.   Text   PDF
the anterior wing. Exp. l 11/20 inch. In the Collection of A. R. Wallace, from Singapore. 7. Myrina Otraeda, Hewitson. PLATE XV. fig. 34. UPPERSIDE cerulean blue: the inner margin slightly curved, projecting. Anterior wing with the costal margin, the apex, and nervures black. Posterior wing tailed: the costal margin broadly black. UNDERSIDE white. Both wings crossed beyond the middle by a common rufous band. [page] 3
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WSPEC030    Book:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1862-1878. Illustrations of diurnal Lepidoptera, part I. Lycaenidae [text]. London.   Text   PDF
wing white (the apex rufous), with eight brown spots, followed by several zigzag black lines: the caudal spot, the lobe, and the space between them crowned with silvery blue: a spot above the lobe also powdered with blue: the outer margin black: the fringe white. Female does not differ from the male, except that it is rufous brown above, and has the anal angle of the posterior wing grey, marked with the caudal spots. Exp. l 7/20 inch. In the Collection of W. C. Hewitson, from Singapore and Sumatra
14%
WSPEC030    Book:     Hewitson, William Chapman. 1862-1878. Illustrations of diurnal Lepidoptera, part I. Lycaenidae [text]. London.   Text   PDF
white: on the underside it does not differ from the male, except that the tails are white. Exp. 1 2/10 inch. In the Collections of the British Museum and A. R. Wallace, from Singapore. On the underside this species varies considerably in the form of the line which crosses the anterior wing beyond the middle, as well as in the size of the black spots of the posterior wing. [page] 3
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